ancientFT
Source: War Dog
Dogs have held an important place in the world since the dawn of civilization. From some of the world's earliest artwork and cultures, pups have been a fixture of daily life. Some of our most well-known ancient societies and cultures upheld pups to the highest degree. Here is a round-up of dogs emblazoned in ancient artwork.
1. Mosaic Panel With Seated Dog, Byzantine, Syria - Even ancient pups patiently waited for treats.
2. Mosaic On Floor Depicting A Dog And A Knocked-Over Gold Vessel, Italy - The meticulous attention to detail gives life to this dog's expression.
Source: Catherine Mayo
3. Ancient Greek Marble Statue Of A Dog, Greece - Fun fact: In Ancient Greece, dogs were beloved and also associated with the goddesses Hecate and Artemis.
Source: Smithsonian.com
4. Mosaic Of Hercules With Dog Cerberus, Greece - Loyal and faithful companions for centuries.
5. Roman Statue Of Greek Goddess Of Hunting, Artemis, Italy - In Greek mythology, Artemis used dogs to accompany her on hunting expeditions.
6. Relief Of Ashurbanipal Mastiff, The British Museum - In ancient societies, dogs were kept for protection but were also revered family members. Ancient Greeks and Romans wrote heartfelt epitaphs when their companions passed on.
7. Roman Statue Of A Pair Of Dogs, The British Museum - This statue was originally found at a place called Dog Mountain, near Rome. Other dog sculptures were also found on site.
8. Limestone Statuette Of Anubis, The Manchester Museum - Ancient Egyptians loved dogs so much that their god Anubis had the head of a pup. More so, when dogs passed on into the afterlife, if a family could afford it, they also had their pup mummified.
Source: Ancient.eu
9. Glazed Ceramic Dog, China - Dogs were some of the first domesticated animals in China, with Pekingese being one of the earliest ancient breeds.
Source: Your Wild Life
10. Ancient Greek Dog Shaped Drinking Vessel, Jérôme Carcopino Museum - Ancient Greeks loved dogs so much that they made drinking casks in their image.
Source: Wikipedia
11. The Jennings Dog, The British Museum - While this sculpture is a Roman copy of the ancient, extinct Molossus breed from southern Europe. The modern day counterpart to this stoic breed would be the Mastiff.
Source: wordscene
12. Roman Mosaic Of Small Boy With Puppy, The Mosaics Museum - Dog ownership was fairly common in ancient civilizations, and children often bonded with their furry family members just like today.
13. Egyption Mechanical Running Dog, Ivory, The Metropolitan Museum Of Art - This art piece could open and close its mouth by pulling the lever. Pawhaps this could have been a very fancy toy?
Source: Master Art
13. Egyption Mechanical Running Dog, Ivory, The Metropolitan Museum Of Art - This art piece could open and close its mouth by pulling the lever. Pawhaps this could have been a very fancy toy?
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14 Ancient Artworks Reveal How Our Love For Dogs Goes Back Thousands Of Years

Featured image via The Ancient Art Blog

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