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3 Things You May Be Feeding Your Dog That Could Cut Short Their Life

3 Things You May Be Feeding Your Dog That Could Cut Short Their Life

When it comes to human food, it’s our own fault if we have health problems because we choose to eat copious amounts of food with scary ingredients. Velveeta, Coke, microwave popcorn… Ever read the ingredients on this delicious stuff?

Since our beloved pups don’t get to choose the food that they eat, as good pup parents we should try to be as educated as paw-ssible so that we know what goes in their kibble every meal. Below are a few strange ingredients that are usually found in lower-end foods that you probably want to avoid for your pup. They’re kind of like the hot dog ingredients of dog food. (As someone who has been trying to give up hot dogs for a long time, this is inspiring me to reapply myself to my endeavor. ;P)

quickmeme

Image via QuickMeme

 

Glyceryl Monostearate: GMS is a colorless, odorless, and sweet-tasting flaky powder that is commonly used as a food additive to thicken and preserve foods. It’s used in everything from cosmetics, body building products, to hair care products. GMS is approved by the FDA for human consumption but there is a lot of controversy around it because there are studies that show GMS causes toxicity in certain organs.

Image via Medicines Complete

Image via Medicines Complete

 

Propylene Glycol: Propylene glycol is a clear, colorless liquid with the consistency of syrup. It is practically odorless and tasteless and it is used in semi-moist kibble to keep it from drying out. Even though you can find propylene glycol in many beverages, crackers, cakes, beers, and salad dressings, there are conflicting reports on whether it is toxic in large amounts. In some countries in Europe where the authorities are a lot more strict on what’s allowed in foods, propylene glycol is restricted to non-food uses.

 Image via HuffPo


Image via HuffPo

 

Phosphoric Acid: Phosphoric acid is commonly used in human food to add an acidic and sour taste. When it is in Coke and sodas, it is actually the ingredient that is responsible for dissolving teeth. It’s not in that concentration in dog food but if you see phosphoric acid in your pup’s food, it usually means there is a low-quality fat in the food.

Image via Coca Cola

Image via Coca Cola

 

Featured Image via Getty Images

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